Quick Answer: What is graft stitch?

Grafting, also known as Kitchener stitch or weaving, joins two sets of stitches that are still on the needle (a.k.a. “live”) by using a tapestry needle threaded with yarn to create a row that looks like knit stitches between them.

What does graft mean in knitting?

Grafting (also called kitchener stitch) is a technique used to join two pieces of knitting without any seam by joining together the live stitches of each piece.

Is grafting the same as Kitchener Stitch?

It’s not magic! It’s called the Kitchener stitch. The Kitchener stitch (also known as “grafting”) involves weaving two live (still on the needle) edges together without creating a ridge — or even a break in the stitching.

What does graft stitches together mean?

Grafting, also known as Kitchener stitch or weaving, joins two sets of stitches that are still on the needle (a.k.a. “live”) by using a tapestry needle threaded with yarn to create a row that looks like knit stitches between them.

How do you graft a rib in knitting?

Grafting 2×2 Ribbing

  1. Pull needle through first front st as if to knit.
  2. Pull needle through first back st as if to purl.
  3. Pull needle through first front st as if to purl and slip st off needle.
  4. Pull needle through next front st as if to purl, but leave st on needle.
  5. Pull needle through first back st as if to knit and slip st off needle.
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